The 7th Healthy Al, Healthy Me Day was SO Much Fun!

For 7 years, children have been celebrating Healthy Al, Healthy Me Day! It’s a chance for teachers to highlight the work they do to help children learn about healthy foods and the importance of being active. This year brought lots of creative activities to classrooms across the country, in Canada, and Bermuda. Here’s a sampling of the fun!

At St. James’s Children’s Center in Richmond VA, the children heard Al’s Action Story and played Al Says (like Simon Says). They had a great time with the guessing game, What Animal Am I? The classrooms had taste tests and the children told their parents all about the new foods they tried. It was such a fun way to learn about healthy habits!

Act out the animal. Can you guess what I am?

 

In Hot Springs AR, at the Langston Magnet School, Carol Gibbs’ class read the Al’s Action Story and the children acted out all the moving parts. The kids loved it so much that they are now re-telling and acting out the story themselves. They rolled the Activity Cube and even taught some older kids, who came to read to the class, how to play. They used the Foot Pattern Hopscotch  to hop around the room. Their day ended with the children drawing self-portraits with “empty” bellies, then having a nutritious snack from each food group. Afterward, they drew what they ate for snack to “fill their bellies” on the self-portraits.

The visitors joined the jumping jacks and dancing!

 

Kathi Rosbottom reported that the children at Highview Public School in Ontario, Canada love Al and had a great day! She used lots of activities from the AcornDreams website: the mazes, a tasting party, and the matching game. They made and decorated the hats, too! The children loved it all.

 

 

So many good tastes!
We worked hard on our hats!

The children in Janet Clemons’ class at Westview Early Childhood Center in Petersburg VA got their parents involved. They wanted to have some healthy snacks to eat so parents brought in bags of clementines, red apples, and pretzels. Ms. Clemons reports that they talk about healthy eating regularly, and they discuss the fruits and vegetables they like before lunch which encourages the children to eat them more often.

 

 

In Fort Wayne IN, at Lifeline Youth & Family Services, Bernice Bush’s morning and afternoon classes participated in the “fun and educational activities and as well as some music with Al!” The children talked about healthy food and practiced building the food pyramid. Snack time included pinwheel sandwiches (turkey and cream cheese wraps), grapes, apple slices, carrots, apple juice, and water.

      

 

At St. Andrews School in Richmond VA, the children in Madeline Hendrix’s class had a lively discussion about what healthy food they like and what they do to keep active. They like to eat strawberries, broccoli, carrots, and apples. To stay healthy, the kids love to run, ride bikes, and play basketball. They used the Activity Cube to “work out!”  Jumping jacks, hopping on one foot, windmill arms, and running in place got their hearts beating, and there was lots of laughter, too!

   

 

So it was another great Healthy Al, Healthy Me Day! And remember that all the resources for these and other activities are always available here, including this new activity for 2019.

Fruit and Veggie Figures

Easy Ways to Spread Kindness

“No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.” Aesop

February 17 is Random Act of Kindness Day. We see long lists of ideas for being kind and spreading acts of kindness. The ideas are wonderful and we think, “I could do that one, and that one, and maybe that one.” But do we? The reality is that sometimes we get bogged down by the demands of everyday life – and there is a lot going on!

Simple Acts of Kindness

So what can we do to combat the day-to-day drag-down and promote positive energy and kindness? Let’s start small, just with ourselves. Here are a few concrete, simple acts that we can each do, every day, right now.

  1. Eye-to-eye: When you pass someone, look them in the eye and smile. It’s amazing to see their face light up as they smile back – and they usually do.
  2. “After you”: Let someone go ahead of you in line – any line. At the coffee shop, in the grocery store, step back and gesture them in. Yes, you may be in a hurry, but it only adds a few minutes, and the goodwill lasts much longer, for both of you.
  3. Help others: Keep a pack of bottled water in your car, and hand them out to folks on the corner asking for help.
  4. Don’t talk: Make an effort to really listen when someone is talking to you. Look at the person, nod your head, pay attention. And put your phone down. It lets that person know that you value their thoughts, and that you value them. And all we have to do is open our hearts and close our mouths.
  5. Write it down: Leave a note on someone’s keyboard, pillow, lunch box, steering wheel, or gym bag saying what you appreciate about them.
  6. Be present: Put your phone away and make a connection. In person.
  7. Be kind to yourself: In the midst of our busy lives, we sometimes forget to take care of ourselves. Remember that we cannot give what we do not have. If we are worn out and depleted, it’s hard to give. Think about what restores you – slow, deep breaths, a quick nap, a soothing cup of tea, a brisk walk, positive thinking? Try to make it happen.

And let’s keep it up beyond the day! When we are aware of how we interact with those around us, we can start a kindness revolution, an upward spiral of goodwill. Plus, we are modeling the kind of behavior we want our children to see and copy. So try to smile, listen, and connect. You will feel as good as the people you do it to!

A note of thanks.
a note of thanks

Ready or Not, Here Comes Kindergarten!

Summer is a Great Time to Get Ready for School

There’s lots of talk about school readiness, but what does that really mean?

School readiness is more than basic knowledge of language and math, important as these are. Being ready for school means being ready in all areas: physical, cognitive, AND social-emotional. It also helps to come with a positive attitude toward learning.

There are many facets to helping a child prepare for success in school and summer is a good time to support your child’s readiness. These tips can help make the transition a smooth one.

Lots of new experiences at school!
Lots of new experiences at school!

Practical strategies to help kids prepare for daily school life:

  • Helping hands. Have children take on more responsibility as a member of the household. Together with your child, come up with a list of chores that he can do this summer. Some ideas are tidying up his room, helping with meal clean-up, feeding and brushing a pet, sweeping the kitchen, sorting laundry, making his bed, putting away groceries, planning a meal. Children will have more responsibility at school, so this is good practice. And children thrive when they contribute to and feel like a part of a group.
  • Fine motor fun. Give children a chance to use scissors, glue, and paints, or build with small blocks or legos. These activities help with fine motor development and spark creativity.
  • I did it myself! Look for opportunities to let your child do more things herself. Can she order her own lunch, carry a tray, speak to the cashier or librarian, or pack and zip up her backpack? This builds independence and gives her the message that you believe she is capable.
  • Play. Games that have rules, require waiting, or involve counting are great for practicing self-control, understanding rules, and learning how to take turns. Old favorites like Red Light/Green Light, Mother May I, and Simon Says help children learn the difference between right and wrong, fairness, and delayed gratification.
  • Silence is golden. If your child is talkative, help him remember to share the talking time. Have a discussion about taking time to listen to others and waiting to talk sometimes. This is another opportunity to work on self-regulation – remembering to stop and think before speaking.
  • But why? Encourage curiosity, discovery, and exploration. Get books from the library on topics that your child asks questions about. Look things up online together. Try new foods – have taste tests with unusual fruits or vegetables. Be curious yourself and ask questions about how things work, or grow, or fly (weather, nature, animals, space).
  • Hit the books. Read, read, and read some more. Reading together promotes emerging literacy and language development. And research shows that reading to a child is the single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading. Plus that time together evokes warm feelings about reading and enriches your relationship with your child!

Strategies to support emotional readiness:

  • Focus on feelings. Listen for the feelings. When your child talks about starting school, stop and listen. Accept all feelings and resist the urge to say “don’t worry” or “there’s nothing to be nervous about” or “you’ll be fine”. Instead of talking him out of his feeling, validate the feeling: “It sounds like you are worried about being in a new classroom. Lots of kids would feel worried about that.” Let that soak in for a minute, then add something like, “Let’s imagine what you think it will look like. Then we can compare that to what we see when we visit.”
  • Teach kindness and friendship. When reading together or out in the real world, point out and talk about what it means to be a good friend. What does kindness look like? How do friends treat each other? Model kind acts by letting someone go ahead of you in line, keep bottled water in your car and hand them out to folks on the corner asking for help, visit a neighbor, take flowers to a friend for no reason.
  • Share your memories. Tell stories of starting school or talk about when you started something new. Certainly be genuine, but spend the most time on the positive parts of your experience: making new friends, learning cool things, getting new supplies.
  • Spend time together. Designate some time when there are no electronic devices and really connect. Spend 15 minutes doing whatever your child chooses (that doesn’t involve technology!); try to have dinner together as often as possible (device-free); take advantage of time in the car to talk and sing together; make time to snuggle.

You child will appreciate your attention during any of these activities. Your positive attitude about starting school will set the tone and help to make it something to look forward to!

Here’s to a healthy new year!

Want some fresh ideas for delicious, child-friendly meals? Check out our Pinterest Board here! You will find recipes for simple healthy snacks like Morning Glory Muffins and meals like Turkey Taco Lettuse Wraps.